FAQs on Post-Operative Pain Control

By The Medical City , | October 11, 2018


Will I experience pain after my surgery?

Yes, you will. Even with improved and advanced surgical techniques, people still feel some pain and discomfort after surgery, since even minor surgery causes swelling and the breakup of tissue. However, each individual has a difference tolerance level for pain and reacts to pain in different ways.

 

It is important for you to communicate with your health care team to better control your post-operative pain. It is important to note that some patients who undergo surgery under local or regional anesthesia may not feel pain until the local anesthetic wears off.

 

What kind of pain will I have?

Different surgical procedures cause different types of pain. The intensity of your pain can range from mild to severe. It can be a throbbing, aching, burning, or irritating sensation.

 

How do I communicate my pain to my health care team?

You will be asked to use a pain scale to help describe your pain level.

 

It is a tool that will help measure the severity of your pain, and will also serve as a guide for your health care team in managing your pain. If 0 means no pain and 10 is the worst pain possible, how would you rate how you feel?

 

 

To relieve your pain most effectively, your health care team needs to know how well pain relief measures are working for you. Medications can be adjusted to meet your needs.

 

What kind of pain medicine will I receive after surgery?

Your doctor will choose a method of pain management based on your surgery, your medical history, the amount of pain you are experiencing, and where you are on the road to recovery. Initially, to help relieve you of immediate post-op pain, medications may be given intravenously (IV) or intramuscularly (IM), or if appropriate, through an epidural catheter (very small tubing threaded into the outermost section of the spinal canal, femoral canal, popliteal and sciatic area).

 

·       One popular method is called a Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) pump. This PCA machine will deliver a dose of pain medication through your intravenous line or epidural catheter when you press the button. Of course, it is programmed with safety feature to avoid overdosing. A measured dose of narcotic is delivered with each use and you can only receive a certain amount of medication each hour. It is important for you to communicate with your health care team if the pain medication is not effective.

 

Adjustments can be made to your PCA or IV. Your pain may not completely disappear, but we should be able to provide adequate comfort for you post-operatively.

 

As your hospital stay nears its end, you will probably be switched to oral pain medication. You may also be given a prescription for pain relieving pills to take home.

 

What are the benefits of adequate post-operative pain relief?

Pain medication allows you to be up and around more comfortably. Movement is easier when it does not hurt. This helps healing and circulation and can prevent post-op problems such as blood clots and pneumonia. All this can add up to a shorter hospital stay.

 

Who do I communicate with regarding my pain relief?

Your surgeon and anesthesiologist are interested in your pain management. Always feel free to communicate with them and the other hospital team members. There are different methods of pain medication administration and pain relief. We are dedicated to making your hospital stay as comfortable as possible.

 

How can The Medical City help you?

At The Medical City, we have a complete roster of competent pain experts who can address different types of pain. For further inquiries, or if you want to seek consult, please call:

 

PAIN MANAGEMENT CLINIC

3/F Nursing Tower 1, The Medical City

Tel. No. (+632) 988-1000 / (+632) 988-7000 ext. 6453

Email: painclinic@themedicalcity.com

 

CENTER FOR PATIENT PARTNERSHIP

17/F, Nursing Tower, The Medical City

Tel. No. (+632) 988-1000 / (+632) 988-7000 ext. 6444

Email: cpp@themedicalcity.com

 

Note: This information is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

 

REFERENCES:

·       http://www.reddinganesthesia.com/

·       TMC Pain management clinic

 



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FAQs on Post-Operative Pain Control

By The Medical City ,

October 11, 2018


Will I experience pain after my surgery?

Yes, you will. Even with improved and advanced surgical techniques, people still feel some pain and discomfort after surgery, since even minor surgery causes swelling and the breakup of tissue. However, each individual has a difference tolerance level for pain and reacts to pain in different ways.

 

It is important for you to communicate with your health care team to better control your post-operative pain. It is important to note that some patients who undergo surgery under local or regional anesthesia may not feel pain until the local anesthetic wears off.

 

What kind of pain will I have?

Different surgical procedures cause different types of pain. The intensity of your pain can range from mild to severe. It can be a throbbing, aching, burning, or irritating sensation.

 

How do I communicate my pain to my health care team?

You will be asked to use a pain scale to help describe your pain level.

 

It is a tool that will help measure the severity of your pain, and will also serve as a guide for your health care team in managing your pain. If 0 means no pain and 10 is the worst pain possible, how would you rate how you feel?

 

 

To relieve your pain most effectively, your health care team needs to know how well pain relief measures are working for you. Medications can be adjusted to meet your needs.

 

What kind of pain medicine will I receive after surgery?

Your doctor will choose a method of pain management based on your surgery, your medical history, the amount of pain you are experiencing, and where you are on the road to recovery. Initially, to help relieve you of immediate post-op pain, medications may be given intravenously (IV) or intramuscularly (IM), or if appropriate, through an epidural catheter (very small tubing threaded into the outermost section of the spinal canal, femoral canal, popliteal and sciatic area).

 

·       One popular method is called a Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) pump. This PCA machine will deliver a dose of pain medication through your intravenous line or epidural catheter when you press the button. Of course, it is programmed with safety feature to avoid overdosing. A measured dose of narcotic is delivered with each use and you can only receive a certain amount of medication each hour. It is important for you to communicate with your health care team if the pain medication is not effective.

 

Adjustments can be made to your PCA or IV. Your pain may not completely disappear, but we should be able to provide adequate comfort for you post-operatively.

 

As your hospital stay nears its end, you will probably be switched to oral pain medication. You may also be given a prescription for pain relieving pills to take home.

 

What are the benefits of adequate post-operative pain relief?

Pain medication allows you to be up and around more comfortably. Movement is easier when it does not hurt. This helps healing and circulation and can prevent post-op problems such as blood clots and pneumonia. All this can add up to a shorter hospital stay.

 

Who do I communicate with regarding my pain relief?

Your surgeon and anesthesiologist are interested in your pain management. Always feel free to communicate with them and the other hospital team members. There are different methods of pain medication administration and pain relief. We are dedicated to making your hospital stay as comfortable as possible.

 

How can The Medical City help you?

At The Medical City, we have a complete roster of competent pain experts who can address different types of pain. For further inquiries, or if you want to seek consult, please call:

 

PAIN MANAGEMENT CLINIC

3/F Nursing Tower 1, The Medical City

Tel. No. (+632) 988-1000 / (+632) 988-7000 ext. 6453

Email: painclinic@themedicalcity.com

 

CENTER FOR PATIENT PARTNERSHIP

17/F, Nursing Tower, The Medical City

Tel. No. (+632) 988-1000 / (+632) 988-7000 ext. 6444

Email: cpp@themedicalcity.com

 

Note: This information is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

 

REFERENCES:

·       http://www.reddinganesthesia.com/

·       TMC Pain management clinic

 


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