Giving Up Smoking: What You Need to Know

By The Medical City , | June 13, 2019

Cigarette smoking affects nearly every organ in the body and is attributed to cause many diseases including cancer, chronic lung disease such as COPD and cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. In 2019, there is an estimated 700,000 deaths associated withsmoking.


Cigarette smoking affects nearly every organ in the body and is attributed to cause many diseases including cancer, chronic lung disease such as COPD and cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. In 2019, there is an estimated 700,000 deaths associated withsmoking.

“Deciding to quit smoking" is easy, but maintaining a smoke free status can be difficult and is challenging to smokers especially when it has become a habit and a lifestyle. But it has been done, it can be done, and it's never too late to quit.

If you do decide to give up smoking, here are a few things you need to know:

There are different ways to quit

Interventions that will help you quit smoking include a combination of : Behavioral suppor t groups, nicotine replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy (bupropion and varenicline). But remember, what works for certain people may not work for you, and vice versa. With the help of your doctor or licensed health professional, try out different methods until you find the one that works for you.

Withdrawal symptoms differ for every smoker

Withdrawal symptoms include: Nicotine cravings, irritability, weight gain, mood swings, constipation and cough for the first few weeks of quitting and can last for months.  Certain people may feel these symptoms more intensely than others. Some will have mild symptoms whereas others may experience extreme cravings that could last for weeks.

Once these side effects subside, most people will notice positive changes in their health such as sense of better well being, better breathing, less headaches and cravings.

There are triggers to why you smoke

Certain events, activities, emotions, and even people will make you light up that cigarette. Find these triggers and avoid them.  Remember smokings' hazardous effects and how it affects your body and others around you.  If you can, encourage other people to quit smoking as well. 

The benefits of quitting are huge

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), here’s what you can expect once you decide to give up smoking:

  • Within 20 minutes after your last cigarette, your heart rate begins to normalize.
  • After 8 to 12 hours, your blood carbon monoxide level drops and your blood oxygen rises.
  • After 48 hours, your sense of smell and taste improves.
  • After 2 weeks to 3 months, your risk of heart attack drops.
  • After 1 to 9 months, your coughing and shortness of breath decreases.
  • After 1 year, the risk of heart disease will be cut in half.
  • After 5 years, your risk of stroke drops.
  • After 10 years, your risk of lung cancer drops.
  • After 15 years after quitting, your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as that of a non-smoker.

Don’t quit on quitting

On average, a person attempts to quit several times before giving up smoking for good. According to experts, you have a 3% – 5% chance of quitting on your first try and every try after that, you get an additional 5% chance. So even if you fall back into the habit, keep at it until you quit completely.

How can The Medical City help you?

The Medical City’s START ANEW Program (Smoking and Tobacco Addiction and Relapse Therapy for A Nicotine- Free Way of Life) aids smokers in becoming and staying smoke-free, making them better prepared to deal with significant lifestyle changes. The Program centers on education and motivation, providing individual counseling and psychosocial support groups to help smokers quit and maintain a non- smoking status for life.

We will explore yoursmoking habits, other psychological and behavioral motivation behind smoking and will go through the process of smoking cessation with the help of a physician and a support group.  You will also be assisted on pharmacologic treatments to aid smoking cessation.

True to its value proposition of patient partnership, at The Medical City, you can be assured of genuine and personalized care by medical experts you can trust.  You will be involved in the decision-making every step of the way.

For more information, you may contact:

Pulmonary Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center

2nd floor, Podium building, The Medical City

Tel. no. 988-1000 ext. 6238


Article References:

https://www.webmd.com/lung/features/quit-smoking-for-good#1

https://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/ss/slideshow-copd-overview

https://www.quitterscircle.com/how-to-quit/qc-a-5-how-does-quitting-smoking-change-your-life

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-quitting-smoking-has-changed-my-life-2824706

https://www.healthline.com/health/effects-of-quitting-smoking

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/What-to-expect-when-you-quit-smoking

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2004/posters/20mins/index.htm



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Giving Up Smoking: What You Need to Know

By The Medical City ,

June 13, 2019


Cigarette smoking affects nearly every organ in the body and is attributed to cause many diseases including cancer, chronic lung disease such as COPD and cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. In 2019, there is an estimated 700,000 deaths associated withsmoking.

Cigarette smoking affects nearly every organ in the body and is attributed to cause many diseases including cancer, chronic lung disease such as COPD and cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. In 2019, there is an estimated 700,000 deaths associated withsmoking.

“Deciding to quit smoking" is easy, but maintaining a smoke free status can be difficult and is challenging to smokers especially when it has become a habit and a lifestyle. But it has been done, it can be done, and it's never too late to quit.

If you do decide to give up smoking, here are a few things you need to know:

There are different ways to quit

Interventions that will help you quit smoking include a combination of : Behavioral suppor t groups, nicotine replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy (bupropion and varenicline). But remember, what works for certain people may not work for you, and vice versa. With the help of your doctor or licensed health professional, try out different methods until you find the one that works for you.

Withdrawal symptoms differ for every smoker

Withdrawal symptoms include: Nicotine cravings, irritability, weight gain, mood swings, constipation and cough for the first few weeks of quitting and can last for months.  Certain people may feel these symptoms more intensely than others. Some will have mild symptoms whereas others may experience extreme cravings that could last for weeks.

Once these side effects subside, most people will notice positive changes in their health such as sense of better well being, better breathing, less headaches and cravings.

There are triggers to why you smoke

Certain events, activities, emotions, and even people will make you light up that cigarette. Find these triggers and avoid them.  Remember smokings' hazardous effects and how it affects your body and others around you.  If you can, encourage other people to quit smoking as well. 

The benefits of quitting are huge

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), here’s what you can expect once you decide to give up smoking:

  • Within 20 minutes after your last cigarette, your heart rate begins to normalize.
  • After 8 to 12 hours, your blood carbon monoxide level drops and your blood oxygen rises.
  • After 48 hours, your sense of smell and taste improves.
  • After 2 weeks to 3 months, your risk of heart attack drops.
  • After 1 to 9 months, your coughing and shortness of breath decreases.
  • After 1 year, the risk of heart disease will be cut in half.
  • After 5 years, your risk of stroke drops.
  • After 10 years, your risk of lung cancer drops.
  • After 15 years after quitting, your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as that of a non-smoker.

Don’t quit on quitting

On average, a person attempts to quit several times before giving up smoking for good. According to experts, you have a 3% – 5% chance of quitting on your first try and every try after that, you get an additional 5% chance. So even if you fall back into the habit, keep at it until you quit completely.

How can The Medical City help you?

The Medical City’s START ANEW Program (Smoking and Tobacco Addiction and Relapse Therapy for A Nicotine- Free Way of Life) aids smokers in becoming and staying smoke-free, making them better prepared to deal with significant lifestyle changes. The Program centers on education and motivation, providing individual counseling and psychosocial support groups to help smokers quit and maintain a non- smoking status for life.

We will explore yoursmoking habits, other psychological and behavioral motivation behind smoking and will go through the process of smoking cessation with the help of a physician and a support group.  You will also be assisted on pharmacologic treatments to aid smoking cessation.

True to its value proposition of patient partnership, at The Medical City, you can be assured of genuine and personalized care by medical experts you can trust.  You will be involved in the decision-making every step of the way.

For more information, you may contact:

Pulmonary Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center

2nd floor, Podium building, The Medical City

Tel. no. 988-1000 ext. 6238


Article References:

https://www.webmd.com/lung/features/quit-smoking-for-good#1

https://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/ss/slideshow-copd-overview

https://www.quitterscircle.com/how-to-quit/qc-a-5-how-does-quitting-smoking-change-your-life

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-quitting-smoking-has-changed-my-life-2824706

https://www.healthline.com/health/effects-of-quitting-smoking

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/What-to-expect-when-you-quit-smoking

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2004/posters/20mins/index.htm


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