How to Take Care of Your Voice

By The Medical City , | May 29, 2019

Imagine life without your voice. Without a voice, interacting and relating to people becomes a challenge – it's difficult to express what you want and how you feel. It’s hard to empathize with other people if you can’t hear their voices. Certain tasks become difficult to accomplish when you can’t speak. Many professions depend on a healthy voice. Life is never the same without it.


Imagine life without your voice.

Without a voice, interacting and relating to people becomes a challenge – it's difficult to express what you want and how you feel. It’s hard to empathize with other people if you can’t hear their voices. Certain tasks become difficult to accomplish when you can’t speak. Many professions depend on a healthy voice. Life is never the same without it.

What is a voice?

Your voice is the sound made by the vibration of the vocal folds (also known as vocal cords) bands of muscle tissue in the larynx (commonly called the voice box). Your voice is the foundation for human communication and relations, whether it’s conveying a message or expressing emotion. Voice is also a strong indicator of the age and sex of the speaker.

How is voice created?

The human voice is generated in the following manner:

1. The lungs produce enough air pressure to vibrate your vocal cords

2. The vibrating vocal folds create audible pulses that create sound

3. The muscles of the larynx control pitch and tone while the tongue, palate, cheeks and lips, articulate and filter the sound produced

Just like a fingerprint, your voice is unique, and it helps define your personality. It’s even an indicator of your current mood and state of health.

How do you know if there’s something wrong with your voice?

You may have a problem if you are experiencing any of the following:

• Your throat feels raw, painful, or strained

• You often clear your throat

• Your voice is hoarse or raspy

• You can’t talk or having difficulty talking

What causes voice problems?

• Misuse and improper use of your voice

• Upper respiratory infections

• Acid reflux or heartburn

• Cancer of the larynx

• Growths on the vocal folds (vocal nodules or laryngeal papillomatosis)

• Neurological diseases (spasmodic dysphonia or vocal fold paralysis)

• Psychological trauma

 

How do you take care of your voice?

DO’S

• Drink six to eight glasses a day

• If possible, use a humidifier in your home to minimize dryness of the throat

• If you have voice problems, consult your doctor for the right medication

• Get enough rest. Fatigue may affect your voice.

• Wash your hands regularly to prevent colds and flu

• Exercise regularly

• Talk to your doctor on ways to manage persistent heartburn or GERD

• Eat whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. These foods contain vitamins A, E, and C. They also help keep the mucus membranes that line the throat healthy.

DON’TS

• Avoid too much spicy foods. Spicy foods may cause stomach acid to move up the esophagus and throat, causing heartburn or GERD.

• Avoid mouthwash or gargles that contain alcohol or strong chemical ingredients. If you still wish to use a mouthwash that contains alcohol, limit your use to oral rinsing. When you need to gargle, using a salt water solution is recommended.

• Don’t use mouthwash to treat persistent bad breath. Halitosis (bad breath) may be caused by infections in the nose, sinuses, tonsils, gums, or lungs, as well as from gastric acid reflux from the stomach. These problems require different solutions that your doctor can provide.

• Don't smoke and avoid second-hand smoke. Smoking irritates the vocal cords and is often the cause of cancer in the throat area.

• Don’t drink too much alcohol and caffeinated drinks. These may cause the body to lose water and dry the vocal cords and larynx. Alcohol may irritate the mucous membranes that line the throat.

How do you conserve your voice?

• Avoid speaking or singing when your voice is hoarse or when you are vocally-tired.

• Avoid extreme uses of your voice, such as screaming or whispering. Talking too loudly or too softly can put stress on your larynx. 

• Avoid cradling the phone when talking. When you place your phone between the head and shoulder for extended periods of time, you run the risk of causing muscle tension in your neck. 

• Use a microphone when addressing crowds. Why strain your voice just to be heard when a microphone and a proper sound system can help you deliver your message?

• Avoid speaking in loud, noisy places. We tend to raise our voices in these situations which can cause unnecessary strain on our throats.

• Rest your voice when you are sick, especially when your respiratory system is affected. Notice how your voice changes when you have colds or when you’re down with the flu?

• Practice good breathing techniques to help with your singing or speaking. 

Here’s a simple exercise to get you started:

Take deep breaths from the chest before you speak or sing a line. The idea is not to rely on your throat alone because talking from the throat, without supporting breath, can put a strain on your voice.

• If possible, consult with professionals who specialize in voice therapy. An experienced speech-language pathologist can guide you on how to use your voice in a healthy way.

How can The Medical City help you?

Weare home to many world-class physicians who can assess, diagnose, and treat problems of the voice. The Medical City’s Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Institute has the facilities and expertise to nurse your voice back to health.


For more information, you may contact:

Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Institute at 988-1000 / 988-7000 ext. 6250.



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How to Take Care of Your Voice

By The Medical City ,

May 29, 2019


Imagine life without your voice. Without a voice, interacting and relating to people becomes a challenge – it's difficult to express what you want and how you feel. It’s hard to empathize with other people if you can’t hear their voices. Certain tasks become difficult to accomplish when you can’t speak. Many professions depend on a healthy voice. Life is never the same without it.

Imagine life without your voice.

Without a voice, interacting and relating to people becomes a challenge – it's difficult to express what you want and how you feel. It’s hard to empathize with other people if you can’t hear their voices. Certain tasks become difficult to accomplish when you can’t speak. Many professions depend on a healthy voice. Life is never the same without it.

What is a voice?

Your voice is the sound made by the vibration of the vocal folds (also known as vocal cords) bands of muscle tissue in the larynx (commonly called the voice box). Your voice is the foundation for human communication and relations, whether it’s conveying a message or expressing emotion. Voice is also a strong indicator of the age and sex of the speaker.

How is voice created?

The human voice is generated in the following manner:

1. The lungs produce enough air pressure to vibrate your vocal cords

2. The vibrating vocal folds create audible pulses that create sound

3. The muscles of the larynx control pitch and tone while the tongue, palate, cheeks and lips, articulate and filter the sound produced

Just like a fingerprint, your voice is unique, and it helps define your personality. It’s even an indicator of your current mood and state of health.

How do you know if there’s something wrong with your voice?

You may have a problem if you are experiencing any of the following:

• Your throat feels raw, painful, or strained

• You often clear your throat

• Your voice is hoarse or raspy

• You can’t talk or having difficulty talking

What causes voice problems?

• Misuse and improper use of your voice

• Upper respiratory infections

• Acid reflux or heartburn

• Cancer of the larynx

• Growths on the vocal folds (vocal nodules or laryngeal papillomatosis)

• Neurological diseases (spasmodic dysphonia or vocal fold paralysis)

• Psychological trauma

 

How do you take care of your voice?

DO’S

• Drink six to eight glasses a day

• If possible, use a humidifier in your home to minimize dryness of the throat

• If you have voice problems, consult your doctor for the right medication

• Get enough rest. Fatigue may affect your voice.

• Wash your hands regularly to prevent colds and flu

• Exercise regularly

• Talk to your doctor on ways to manage persistent heartburn or GERD

• Eat whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. These foods contain vitamins A, E, and C. They also help keep the mucus membranes that line the throat healthy.

DON’TS

• Avoid too much spicy foods. Spicy foods may cause stomach acid to move up the esophagus and throat, causing heartburn or GERD.

• Avoid mouthwash or gargles that contain alcohol or strong chemical ingredients. If you still wish to use a mouthwash that contains alcohol, limit your use to oral rinsing. When you need to gargle, using a salt water solution is recommended.

• Don’t use mouthwash to treat persistent bad breath. Halitosis (bad breath) may be caused by infections in the nose, sinuses, tonsils, gums, or lungs, as well as from gastric acid reflux from the stomach. These problems require different solutions that your doctor can provide.

• Don't smoke and avoid second-hand smoke. Smoking irritates the vocal cords and is often the cause of cancer in the throat area.

• Don’t drink too much alcohol and caffeinated drinks. These may cause the body to lose water and dry the vocal cords and larynx. Alcohol may irritate the mucous membranes that line the throat.

How do you conserve your voice?

• Avoid speaking or singing when your voice is hoarse or when you are vocally-tired.

• Avoid extreme uses of your voice, such as screaming or whispering. Talking too loudly or too softly can put stress on your larynx. 

• Avoid cradling the phone when talking. When you place your phone between the head and shoulder for extended periods of time, you run the risk of causing muscle tension in your neck. 

• Use a microphone when addressing crowds. Why strain your voice just to be heard when a microphone and a proper sound system can help you deliver your message?

• Avoid speaking in loud, noisy places. We tend to raise our voices in these situations which can cause unnecessary strain on our throats.

• Rest your voice when you are sick, especially when your respiratory system is affected. Notice how your voice changes when you have colds or when you’re down with the flu?

• Practice good breathing techniques to help with your singing or speaking. 

Here’s a simple exercise to get you started:

Take deep breaths from the chest before you speak or sing a line. The idea is not to rely on your throat alone because talking from the throat, without supporting breath, can put a strain on your voice.

• If possible, consult with professionals who specialize in voice therapy. An experienced speech-language pathologist can guide you on how to use your voice in a healthy way.

How can The Medical City help you?

Weare home to many world-class physicians who can assess, diagnose, and treat problems of the voice. The Medical City’s Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Institute has the facilities and expertise to nurse your voice back to health.


For more information, you may contact:

Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Institute at 988-1000 / 988-7000 ext. 6250.


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