Tmc ICU Nurse Shares Her Story After Recovering From COVID-19

By The Medical City , | April 24, 2020

Forty-five-year-old Leslie Babasa was first tested for SARS-CoV-2 on March 10. She learned that she was positive three days later, on the same day her daughter celebrated her birthday. On April 4, Leslie was back at work at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of The Medical City (TMC) in Ortigas, Pasig, ready to share her message of hope to COVID-19 patients and their families as well as to her colleagues.


“I know the feeling of loneliness, of not being with your family. Now that I have recovered, I have more courage to give comfort to the patient.”

Forty-five-year-old Leslie Babasa was first tested for SARS-CoV-2 on March 10. She learned that she was positive three days later, on the same day her daughter celebrated her birthday. On April 4, Leslie was back at work at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of The Medical City (TMC) in Ortigas, Pasig, ready to share her message of hope to COVID-19 patients and their families as well as to her colleagues.

“At first, my family was hesitant to allow me to go back to work. But I made them realize that more than doing it for myself, I wanted to do it for my colleagues and our patients,” said Leslie. She was aware that ICU was understaffed since several healthcare workers were placed in quarantine. She knew they needed her now more than ever and because she treats them like family, Leslie was back to her old self as the vibrant and caring nurse her fellow ICU staff are all accustomed to.

“I know that being sick with COVID-19 was just a phase, although a challenging one, but I have recovered. I survived the coronavirus and my experience made me more eager to care for patients, especially those at the ICU,” shared Leslie. 

According to Leslie, her illness started with cough and fever, followed by other symptoms - loss of taste, body malaise, and headaches. She was lucky not to develop severe respiratory distress that requires mechanical ventilation.

She was hospitalized at TMC and described her experience as a lonely challenge, and that having the support of her family and friends helped her get through the weeks in isolation. Leslie was also grateful for the compassionate care she received from TMC doctors, nurses, and support staff.

 

She missed her family and was also worried about their health. Adding to her distress, however, was the discrimination she and her family experienced.

“I was informed by some friends and relatives that I was identified as COVID-19 positive and pictures of me and my husband and even our house were circulating in social media. The news about us said that we should be avoided because my husband and I both had COVID-19 and not to pass by our street so as not to be infected with the virus,” said Leslie.

The worst thing said about her was that she had already died and had been cremated. She was affected by the “fake news” but she chose to channel her energy into something that would help her recover from the virus.

“I lost my sense of taste due to the virus but still, I ate plenty of fruits and vegetables. I also tried to exercise as much as I could. Taking care of myself plus prayers greatly helped me during those difficult times at the hospital,” shared Leslie.

She said she realized how powerful prayer is – it soothes the soul, refreshes the spirit, and causes hope to rise above the pain.

For COVID-19 patients and those awaiting test results, she encourages them to “not lose hope. Hold on to your faith and keep praying.”

“I know the feeling of loneliness, of not being with your family. Now that I have recovered, I have more courage to give comfort to the patient. I am here, back at the “battlefield” for you,” she added.

Another compelling reason for Leslie to report to work as soon as she was feeling better was to be there for her colleagues. As frontline healthcare workers care for patients with COVID-19, they are confronted with a deeply challenging, chaotic environment. They face long hours, changing protocols, supply and PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) shortages, and risks to their health and that of their loved ones.

“To my colleagues and fellow healthcare workers, keep your spirits high. We took an oath that we will devote ourselves to the welfare of those committed to our care. This may be a more difficult path as of now, but it may be better tomorrow or in the days to come. There’s light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel so let us continue to be the angels at the patient’s bedside,” she said.

She also appealed to the public to treat healthcare workers and COVID-19 patients with respect and sympathy, and not as outcasts and disease carriers.

“Instead of discriminating patients and healthcare workers, let us help and support one another. With unity and cooperation, we will win this pandemic together. We ask that you also keep us in your prayers.”



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Tmc ICU Nurse Shares Her Story After Recovering From COVID-19

By The Medical City ,

April 24, 2020


Forty-five-year-old Leslie Babasa was first tested for SARS-CoV-2 on March 10. She learned that she was positive three days later, on the same day her daughter celebrated her birthday. On April 4, Leslie was back at work at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of The Medical City (TMC) in Ortigas, Pasig, ready to share her message of hope to COVID-19 patients and their families as well as to her colleagues.

“I know the feeling of loneliness, of not being with your family. Now that I have recovered, I have more courage to give comfort to the patient.”

Forty-five-year-old Leslie Babasa was first tested for SARS-CoV-2 on March 10. She learned that she was positive three days later, on the same day her daughter celebrated her birthday. On April 4, Leslie was back at work at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of The Medical City (TMC) in Ortigas, Pasig, ready to share her message of hope to COVID-19 patients and their families as well as to her colleagues.

“At first, my family was hesitant to allow me to go back to work. But I made them realize that more than doing it for myself, I wanted to do it for my colleagues and our patients,” said Leslie. She was aware that ICU was understaffed since several healthcare workers were placed in quarantine. She knew they needed her now more than ever and because she treats them like family, Leslie was back to her old self as the vibrant and caring nurse her fellow ICU staff are all accustomed to.

“I know that being sick with COVID-19 was just a phase, although a challenging one, but I have recovered. I survived the coronavirus and my experience made me more eager to care for patients, especially those at the ICU,” shared Leslie. 

According to Leslie, her illness started with cough and fever, followed by other symptoms - loss of taste, body malaise, and headaches. She was lucky not to develop severe respiratory distress that requires mechanical ventilation.

She was hospitalized at TMC and described her experience as a lonely challenge, and that having the support of her family and friends helped her get through the weeks in isolation. Leslie was also grateful for the compassionate care she received from TMC doctors, nurses, and support staff.

 

She missed her family and was also worried about their health. Adding to her distress, however, was the discrimination she and her family experienced.

“I was informed by some friends and relatives that I was identified as COVID-19 positive and pictures of me and my husband and even our house were circulating in social media. The news about us said that we should be avoided because my husband and I both had COVID-19 and not to pass by our street so as not to be infected with the virus,” said Leslie.

The worst thing said about her was that she had already died and had been cremated. She was affected by the “fake news” but she chose to channel her energy into something that would help her recover from the virus.

“I lost my sense of taste due to the virus but still, I ate plenty of fruits and vegetables. I also tried to exercise as much as I could. Taking care of myself plus prayers greatly helped me during those difficult times at the hospital,” shared Leslie.

She said she realized how powerful prayer is – it soothes the soul, refreshes the spirit, and causes hope to rise above the pain.

For COVID-19 patients and those awaiting test results, she encourages them to “not lose hope. Hold on to your faith and keep praying.”

“I know the feeling of loneliness, of not being with your family. Now that I have recovered, I have more courage to give comfort to the patient. I am here, back at the “battlefield” for you,” she added.

Another compelling reason for Leslie to report to work as soon as she was feeling better was to be there for her colleagues. As frontline healthcare workers care for patients with COVID-19, they are confronted with a deeply challenging, chaotic environment. They face long hours, changing protocols, supply and PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) shortages, and risks to their health and that of their loved ones.

“To my colleagues and fellow healthcare workers, keep your spirits high. We took an oath that we will devote ourselves to the welfare of those committed to our care. This may be a more difficult path as of now, but it may be better tomorrow or in the days to come. There’s light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel so let us continue to be the angels at the patient’s bedside,” she said.

She also appealed to the public to treat healthcare workers and COVID-19 patients with respect and sympathy, and not as outcasts and disease carriers.

“Instead of discriminating patients and healthcare workers, let us help and support one another. With unity and cooperation, we will win this pandemic together. We ask that you also keep us in your prayers.”


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