Zika Virus Health Advisory

By The Medical City , | February 08, 2016


ZIKA VIRUS HEALTH ADVISORY

KEY FACTS
• Zika virus disease is caused by a virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes.
• There is no specific treatment or vaccine currently available.
• The best form of prevention is protection against mosquito bites.
• The virus is known to circulate in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific.

CURRENT STATISTICS EPIDEMIOLOGY:
• In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil.
• According to the latest figures on the epicenter of the outbreak, Brazil has 4,000 suspected cases of microcephaly, with 270 confirmed with evidence of an infection

TRANSMISSION:
Zika virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. This is the same mosquito that transmits dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever.
• These mosquitoes typically lay eggs in and near standing water in things like buckets, bowls, animal dishes, flower pots and vases. They are aggressive daytime biters, prefer to bite people, and live indoors and outdoors near people.
• Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites
Rarely, From Mother To Child
• A mother already infected with Zika virus near the time of delivery can pass on the virus to her newborn around the time of birth, but this is rare.
• It is possible that Zika virus could be passed from mother to fetus during pregnancy. This mode of transmission is being investigated.
• To date, there are no reports of infants getting Zika virus through breastfeeding. Because of the benefits of breastfeeding, mothers are encouraged to breastfeed even in areas where Zika virus is found.
Through infected blood or sexual contact
• Spread of the virus through blood transfusion and sexual contact have been reported.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:
• About 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus become ill (i.e., develop Zika).
• The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) for Zika virus disease is not known, but is likely to be a few days to a week.
• The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.
• Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for a few days but it can be found longer in some people.

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT
• Prevention and control relies on reducing mosquitoes through source reduction (removal and modification of breeding sites) and reducing contact between mosquitoes and people.
• Avoid infection by preventing mosquito bites:
• Use insect repellents
• Use air conditioning or window/ door screens.
• Wear long – sleeved shirts and long pants or permethrin- treated clothing
• Empty, clean or cover containers that can hold water such as buckets, flower pots or tyres, so that places where mosquitoes can breed are removed.
• People sick with Zika virus should get plenty of rest, drink enough fluids, and treat pain and fever with common medicines.
• If symptoms worsen, they should seek medical care and advice

TMC PLAN/ACTION:
Information dissemination and education posters in all strategic areas of our health facility.

Reference:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/760956/doh-says-ph-still-free-of-zika-virus



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Zika Virus Health Advisory

By The Medical City ,

February 08, 2016


ZIKA VIRUS HEALTH ADVISORY

KEY FACTS
• Zika virus disease is caused by a virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes.
• There is no specific treatment or vaccine currently available.
• The best form of prevention is protection against mosquito bites.
• The virus is known to circulate in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific.

CURRENT STATISTICS EPIDEMIOLOGY:
• In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil.
• According to the latest figures on the epicenter of the outbreak, Brazil has 4,000 suspected cases of microcephaly, with 270 confirmed with evidence of an infection

TRANSMISSION:
Zika virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. This is the same mosquito that transmits dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever.
• These mosquitoes typically lay eggs in and near standing water in things like buckets, bowls, animal dishes, flower pots and vases. They are aggressive daytime biters, prefer to bite people, and live indoors and outdoors near people.
• Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites
Rarely, From Mother To Child
• A mother already infected with Zika virus near the time of delivery can pass on the virus to her newborn around the time of birth, but this is rare.
• It is possible that Zika virus could be passed from mother to fetus during pregnancy. This mode of transmission is being investigated.
• To date, there are no reports of infants getting Zika virus through breastfeeding. Because of the benefits of breastfeeding, mothers are encouraged to breastfeed even in areas where Zika virus is found.
Through infected blood or sexual contact
• Spread of the virus through blood transfusion and sexual contact have been reported.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:
• About 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus become ill (i.e., develop Zika).
• The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) for Zika virus disease is not known, but is likely to be a few days to a week.
• The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.
• Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for a few days but it can be found longer in some people.

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT
• Prevention and control relies on reducing mosquitoes through source reduction (removal and modification of breeding sites) and reducing contact between mosquitoes and people.
• Avoid infection by preventing mosquito bites:
• Use insect repellents
• Use air conditioning or window/ door screens.
• Wear long – sleeved shirts and long pants or permethrin- treated clothing
• Empty, clean or cover containers that can hold water such as buckets, flower pots or tyres, so that places where mosquitoes can breed are removed.
• People sick with Zika virus should get plenty of rest, drink enough fluids, and treat pain and fever with common medicines.
• If symptoms worsen, they should seek medical care and advice

TMC PLAN/ACTION:
Information dissemination and education posters in all strategic areas of our health facility.

Reference:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/760956/doh-says-ph-still-free-of-zika-virus


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